Tell your stories to connect and dicover: no shame, no blame!


I attended City Speaksa storytelling event, last night in Pompano Beach, Florida, which reminds me, back in the days in my homeland  Haiti, when my dad used to gather us together, just to tell us stories.

Sometimes, they were folktales of Bouki and Malis, the villain and the smart; and other times it was just about his personal stories, telling us about his day to day dealing with  this thing called “life.”

Last night, it was about life stories from folks in the city, telling us their narratives about their life segments, and how they intersect with us, the listeners.

There were tellers, there were listeners. Moods swang from joy to sorrow. It was a real life experience.

I enjoyed it. It was a person to person moment. I discovered myself in the stories I heard, and connected with the speakers.

As Mij Byram, an expert storyteller, who introduced the event, said :

“Storytelling is about the connection. That connection is not magic. It’s real. It is about touching the hearts and imaginations of listeners. It is opening them to adventures, feelings and possibilities.”

“In  a story,”Mij added, “we can walk through fear and chase the villain. We can experience sorrow and joy and do it in the safe harbor of a story. A story can change thoughts and ideas.  A story can touch your heart, make you laugh or make you cry, it can comfort or challenge. A story can help you see yourself and your world in a new way.”

That’s excatly what happened to me when I left Pompano Beach last night reflecting, thinking, and pondering about what I heard about immigration, illegal immigration, thick accent, police interactions with black people, depression, and anxiety.

It was fascinated. A great delightful moment. I loved it.

Be well,

Roosevelt

 

NB.: City Speaks is a 50 minute event followed by a time of public interaction and reflection. To know more about their programming click here….

Advertisements

Remember your story, carry your story, and tell your story!


“I hope that you will always remember your story, and that you will carry your story with you as proudly as I carry mine.” First Lady Michele Obama told a graduating class of 100 students, giving the commencement address to Santa Fe Indian School.

Mrs Obama

She personalized the history of the African American experience, and shared her family’s roots in 19th century American chattel slavery. Her remarks seemed geared toward moving beyond a sense of connection between her and the audience, which was already palpable in the hall, to something deeper, something more akin to identification.

I am the great-great-granddaughter of Jim Robinson, who was born in South Carolina, lived as a slave and is likely buried in an unmarked grave on the plantation where he worked.

I am the great-granddaughter of Fraser Robinson, an illiterate houseboy who taught himself to read and became an entrepreneur—selling newspapers and shoes.

She spoke of values, claiming the shared values of respect, perseverance and integrity, three of the ten core values of the Santa Fe Indian School. She remarked on the hopeful, positive trajectory of the school and the accomplishments of its students.

Our story is about who we are. When we talk about our experiences, what we see, feel, do, fear, like with our own words, we create our own life.

Don’t try to be the next so and so. Be the first you. Remember your story, carry your story, and tell your story.

Your story makes you you.

Roosevelt

 

 

 

 

Tell your story with your own words, and live your life.


What we talk about is our story. Our story is about who we are. When we talk about our experiences, what we see, feel, do, fear, like with our own words, we create our own life.

We market ourselves by telling our story.

Marketing is storytelling, said best selling author and blogger Seth Goddin.

The story of you built you.  Your story makes you you.

Sometimes the way you see yourself isn’t exactly the way others see you. Not as good as you think you are. Not as bad as they think you are.

Tell your story. Tell it on purpose.

Roosevelt