The guilt complex


We have within us, between our ears, a simple thing called conscience which teaches us there’s a right and wrong approach to life.

We know when we act contrary to our conscience we feel guilty, and this feeling impacts negatively our thoughts.

This behavior bestows upon us what author David Schwartz called the guilt complex in his book The Magic of Thinking Big.

The guilt complex is what in turn may  break our thought process becuase our mind is constantly asking, ‘will I get caught? Will I get caught?’

We have within us a deep desire to be right, think right, and act right. But our human nature, if let by itself, goes wild, derails us against our conscience to act in the wrong way, which derails the course of our life.

How can we take our behavior into our own hands to avoid situations that will cause us to ask ourselves, Will I get caught?, and instead of creating productive daily habits to live intentionnally for excellence,  we spend our mind capacity to imagine ways to get away with it.

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The long run and the short runs


“It’s easy to look at the long run and lull yourself into skipping a day now and then. But, the long run is made up of short runs,” this is what I read from a blog posted by bestselling author and blogger Set Godin.

The following are some questions Set Godin asked in his post that I invite you to reflect upon:

Is there something you do every day that builds an asset for you?

Every single day?

Something that creates another bit of intellectual property that belongs to you?

Something that makes an asset you own more valuable?

Something that you learn?

“Every single day is a lot of days”, Godin says.

 

Tell your stories to connect and dicover: no shame, no blame!


I attended City Speaksa storytelling event, last night in Pompano Beach, Florida, which reminds me, back in the days in my homeland  Haiti, when my dad used to gather us together, just to tell us stories.

Sometimes, they were folktales of Bouki and Malis, the villain and the smart; and other times it was just about his personal stories, telling us about his day to day dealing with  this thing called “life.”

Last night, it was about life stories from folks in the city, telling us their narratives about their life segments, and how they intersect with us, the listeners.

There were tellers, there were listeners. Moods swang from joy to sorrow. It was a real life experience.

I enjoyed it. It was a person to person moment. I discovered myself in the stories I heard, and connected with the speakers.

As Mij Byram, an expert storyteller, who introduced the event, said :

“Storytelling is about the connection. That connection is not magic. It’s real. It is about touching the hearts and imaginations of listeners. It is opening them to adventures, feelings and possibilities.”

“In  a story,”Mij added, “we can walk through fear and chase the villain. We can experience sorrow and joy and do it in the safe harbor of a story. A story can change thoughts and ideas.  A story can touch your heart, make you laugh or make you cry, it can comfort or challenge. A story can help you see yourself and your world in a new way.”

That’s excatly what happened to me when I left Pompano Beach last night reflecting, thinking, and pondering about what I heard about immigration, illegal immigration, thick accent, police interactions with black people, depression, and anxiety.

It was fascinated. A great delightful moment. I loved it.

Be well,

Roosevelt

 

NB.: City Speaks is a 50 minute event followed by a time of public interaction and reflection. To know more about their programming click here….

The Top Five Regrets of the Dying


Bronnie Ware, an author who worked in palliative care, wrote “The Top Five Regrets of the Dying.”

They are:

1.- I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

2.- I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.

3.- I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.

4.-  I wished I had stayed in touch with my friends

5.-  I wish I had let myself be happier.

These are significant issues. How can we positively address them when we still have some time?

Can we be kinder towards ouselves and others and be more determined to live the life we are truly here to live?

Be well,

Roosevelt

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Hard work and Smart work!


I had an opportunity to listen to leadership guru Chris Brady, co-author with Orrin Woodward of the best seller book: Launching a leadership revolution. His main topic was about hard work and smart work and how to face obstacles and challenges in journeying towards your vision.

You and I will always have to work hard if we want to accomplish something. But we need to make sure we’re working hard at something that really works.

Being busy is not enough. Even ants are being. We have to make sure we’re busy at something that is significant and worthy of our most precious asset which is our time.

Brady mentioned Ronald Reagan who was very effective as an old president. He had a systematic way to move toward his goal. His motto was : Be sure of what your main things are and surround yourself with people who can do what they have called to do.

Brady also mentioned his business partner Orrin Woodward who has a systematic way to keep his focus under pressure and chaotic moments. Woodward always thinks about the big picture, to go beyond the present moment and to make sure good times always follow bad times.

What Brady teaches in this address is for us to understand that there’s always a smart way to do what we do. And we should work hard at the beginning to find that smart way. Hard work is not a long term sustainable advantage. But, it is required impulse from time to time to get the machine running.

Proper work, he said, is a stage between being busy and idle . We need to be busy time to time but we also need to rest and rest means restoration to rebuild ourselves, to rebuild the nerves ending and to start fresh.

Let me share Brady’s video with you. This was at a TEAM leadership seminar. You may copy it and paste it to your browser.

http://www.the-team.biz/DesktopModules/TheTeamPublic/FL/39724887/FLVideoGallery.html

Roosevelt Jean-Francois