What do you see: problems or opportunities?


November7

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Tiger Woods is back to the top. How his ladder climbing out of a slump can help you climb your own ladder?


I don’t play Golf. I even don’t understand the game in its entirety. If I had to explain it, I would say- and correct me if I am wrong- this is a game played by affluent people who have time, money, and prestige on large pristine green grass open-air courses where they discuss business, politics and make deals. The end result is to stroke a small white ball with a club into some small holes in the ground. Sometimes, I heard 18 or 21 holes.

That’s it. That’s all I know.

I also know that Tiger Wood is a golf famed winner. He went from fame to shame after his character and reputation have been widely gone under water after some personal issues in his life, which have also impacted negatively his professional ability to perform.

This emotional saga associated with physical pains led him wonder, just last year, if he would ever play again. He thought he was done. Now look what he’s done.

Last Sunday, he was able to emerge from the funk and win again. Sport analysts rank his last win as impressive as some of his greatest victories.

in an interview, Woods described what his rock bottom moment was, his dread, and what he did not want.

“Probably the low point was not knowing if I’d ever be able to live pain-free again,” Woods said. “Am I going to be able to sit, stand, walk, lay down without feeling the pain that I was in. I just didn’t want to live that way. This is how the rest of my life is going to be? It’s going to be a tough rest of my life. And so … I was beyond playing. I couldn’t sit. I couldn’t walk. I couldn’t lay down without feeling the pain in my back and my leg. That was a pretty low point for a very long time.”

Let me just repeat what kept my attention in this interview:  “It’s going to be a tough rest of my life.”

I go ahead to reflect, think, and ponder about this statement. I put it in perspective, and I pull out a tool, a book I read from the Life Leadership Essentials Series, entitled LADDER, Climbing out of a slump, and to never let a good slump go to waste.

slump

I ask myself what can I learn and share from Tiger Woods’ slump experience. This is a good one to learn from and to not let it go to waste. what can we learn from our slumps and not let them go to waste.

LADDER Climbing out of a Slump, forwarded by Dan Hawkins, a bestselling author, life-coach, and successful entrepreneur, is a book, a tool that will help you discover the art of a slump, and how to take action immediately and effectively.

In my next post, I will share with you the art of climbing a slump, and actions to be taken to live the life you’ve always wanted.

Be well,

#Rooseveltjeanfrancois (Rooseveltjanfranswa)

@rooseveltjf

Roosevelt-pic

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Build confidence, destroy fear, and live the life you want. No regrets!


The following notes are from The Magic of Thinking Big, an outstanding self-development book, published by Dr. David Schwartz.

Fear is real. Fear is psychological. It’s success enemy No 1.

Fear stops people from capitalizing on opportunity; fear wears down physical vitality; fear actually makes people sick, causes organic difficulties, shortens life; fear closes your mouth when you want to speak.

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Fear a powerful force.

All confidence is acquired, developed, and nurtured. No one is born with confidence of the world. You take a big step toward conquering fear when you refuse to remember negative, self-deprecating thoughts.

You can conquer fear of people  if you will learn to put them in “proper perspective.”

How do you face your fears?

How do you build your confidence?

Confucius philosophical leadership learning: The Great Learning!


What the Great Learning teaches is: to illustrate illustrious virtue; to renovate the people; and to rest in the highest excellence.

The point where to rest being known, the object of pursuit is then determined; and, that being determined, an unperturbed calmness may be attained to.

tglTo that calmness there will succeed a tranquil repose. In that repose there may be careful deliberation, and that deliberation will be followed by the attainment of the desired end.

Things have their root and their branches. Affairs have their end and their beginning. To know what is first and what is last will lead near to what is taught in the Great Learning.

The ancients who wished to illustrate illustrious virtue throughout the world, first ordered well their own States.

Wishing to order well their States, they first regulated their families.

Wishing to regulate their families, they first cultivated their persons.

Wishing to cultivate their persons, they first rectified their hearts.

Wishing to rectify their hearts, they first sought to be sincere in their thoughts.

Wishing to be sincere in their thoughts, they first extended to the utmost of their knowledge.

Such extension of knowledge lay in the investigation of things.

Things being investigated, knowledge became complete.

Their knowledge being complete, their thoughts were sincere.

Their thoughts being sincere, their hearts were then rectified.

Their hearts being rectified, their persons were cultivated.

Their persons being cultivated, their families were regulated.

Their families being regulated, their States were rightly governed.

Their States being rightly governed, the entire world was at peace.

From the Son of Heaven down to the mass of the people, all must consider the cultivation of the person the root of everything besides.

It cannot be, when the root is neglected, that what should spring from it will be well ordered.

It never has been the case that what was of great importance has been slightly cared for, and, at the same time, that what was of slight importance has been greatly cared for.

Confucius, The Great Learning.

Hell: ‘Whatever you fear most…’ an oustanding Edwidge Danticat’s folk story!


I am reading Edwige Danticat. Her recent memoir “Brother, I’m dying” is amazing. She tells her family story in poignant way. She combines her story with the story of her dad, her uncle, her countries, her travels, her neighborhood, her grandmas.to free herself, and to free us as well to tell our own story, and to live the life we want.

She used the power of words to include  folktales, stories that she heard from her parents to make good learning lessons from life.

“Hell” is one of those stories told by Danticat’s Granmè Melina.

12501577_114057308995588_315286960_n(1)Here is the story. Enjoy… And share with friends, fans, and family.

A man, one day fell asleep and woke up in a foreign land where he knew no one and no one knew him. Finding himself on his back in the middle of a dirt road, filled with strangers, he looked up at the blurry faces around him, which were framed by a gloomy gray sky, and asked, “Where am I?”

“You’re where you are,” answered a booming voice.

“Where’s that?” he asked.

“Where you need to be,” replied the voice.

“I din’t ask to be here,” the man said, “wherever it is.”

“No matter how you ended up here,” said the voice, “here you are.”

Tired about the roundabout conversation, the man said, “I want you to tell me right now where I am. If you don’t, I’m going to be angry.”

“Who cares about your anger?” answered the voice. “No one is scared of you here.”

Truly upset now, the man said, “Tell me where I am right now!”

“You are in Hell,” replied the voice.

And since these were long time ago, the man didn’t know what hell was, even though he could already see that it was not a happy place.

“What is hell?” he asked.

“Hell”, replied the voice, “is whatever you fear most.”


A story told by Edwige Dandicat in “Brother, I’m dying.” Thanks again Edwige to share with us the power of words and storytelling.

Roosevelt Jean-Francois

Fulbright Scholar, Connector, Speaker

 

 

 

Remember your story, carry your story, and tell your story!


“I hope that you will always remember your story, and that you will carry your story with you as proudly as I carry mine.” First Lady Michele Obama told a graduating class of 100 students, giving the commencement address to Santa Fe Indian School.

Mrs Obama

She personalized the history of the African American experience, and shared her family’s roots in 19th century American chattel slavery. Her remarks seemed geared toward moving beyond a sense of connection between her and the audience, which was already palpable in the hall, to something deeper, something more akin to identification.

I am the great-great-granddaughter of Jim Robinson, who was born in South Carolina, lived as a slave and is likely buried in an unmarked grave on the plantation where he worked.

I am the great-granddaughter of Fraser Robinson, an illiterate houseboy who taught himself to read and became an entrepreneur—selling newspapers and shoes.

She spoke of values, claiming the shared values of respect, perseverance and integrity, three of the ten core values of the Santa Fe Indian School. She remarked on the hopeful, positive trajectory of the school and the accomplishments of its students.

Our story is about who we are. When we talk about our experiences, what we see, feel, do, fear, like with our own words, we create our own life.

Don’t try to be the next so and so. Be the first you. Remember your story, carry your story, and tell your story.

Your story makes you you.

Roosevelt

 

 

 

 

Bill Gates & Warren Buffet: 25 years of friendship, learning and laughing through stories and building memories!


I enjoyed reading Bill Gates’s recent notes published online to mark the anniversary of his 25th friendship anniversary with Warren Buffet.

Bill Gates said this friendship has changed his life for the better in every imaginable way.

He has learned to learn more and laugh more by telling stories and building memories.

Bill met Warren on July 5, 1991 through his parent’s connections. Warren started the conversation by asking questions.

“These were amazingly good questions that nobody had ever asked,” Bill said describing Warren as “modest” and “funny.”

It was a deep friendship from this very first conversation.

Warren nurtures friendship. This is the most important thing Gates has learned from Buffet over the last 25 years. He’s gifted at investing in people. He makes it fun for them to learn from him.

“Everyone should be lucky enough to have a friend who is as thoughtful and kind as Warren. He goes out of his way to make people feel good about themselves and share his joy about life,” Gates noted.

This was originally published at gatesnotes.com


Roosevelt Jean-Francois is a connector. He blogs, speaks, and coaches on leadership, success, business, economy, personal and organizational development.