Ambient reading: new technology, new style of reading, new litterature.


Reading will never be the same. With new access to our new mobile devices, our reading  experience may be different with what it used to be.

With audio books, and eboooks, we consume more and more words, faster and faster.

We also have an opportunity to bring our own personalised experience to our own reading.

This is what writer Nathalie Moris called ‘ambient litterature’ the new way to read. Having the ambiance of our real life soaking, and interacting with our reading bring a fresh appeal to the narrative from the author.

Our mobile reading experience is touched, personalized, and individualized by where we are, the time, and the weather.

This whole combination makes reading a whole new experience.

 

 

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The guilt complex


We have within us, between our ears, a simple thing called conscience which teaches us there’s a right and wrong approach to life.

We know when we act contrary to our conscience we feel guilty, and this feeling impacts negatively our thoughts.

This behavior bestows upon us what author David Schwartz called the guilt complex in his book The Magic of Thinking Big.

The guilt complex is what in turn may  break our thought process becuase our mind is constantly asking, ‘will I get caught? Will I get caught?’

We have within us a deep desire to be right, think right, and act right. But our human nature, if let by itself, goes wild, derails us against our conscience to act in the wrong way, which derails the course of our life.

How can we take our behavior into our own hands to avoid situations that will cause us to ask ourselves, Will I get caught?, and instead of creating productive daily habits to live intentionnally for excellence,  we spend our mind capacity to imagine ways to get away with it.

The long run and the short runs


“It’s easy to look at the long run and lull yourself into skipping a day now and then. But, the long run is made up of short runs,” this is what I read from a blog posted by bestselling author and blogger Set Godin.

The following are some questions Set Godin asked in his post that I invite you to reflect upon:

Is there something you do every day that builds an asset for you?

Every single day?

Something that creates another bit of intellectual property that belongs to you?

Something that makes an asset you own more valuable?

Something that you learn?

“Every single day is a lot of days”, Godin says.

 

The Top Five Regrets of the Dying


Bronnie Ware, an author who worked in palliative care, wrote “The Top Five Regrets of the Dying.”

They are:

1.- I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

2.- I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.

3.- I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.

4.-  I wished I had stayed in touch with my friends

5.-  I wish I had let myself be happier.

These are significant issues. How can we positively address them when we still have some time?

Can we be kinder towards ouselves and others and be more determined to live the life we are truly here to live?

Be well,

Roosevelt

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Tiger Woods is back to the top. How his ladder climbing out of a slump can help you climb your own ladder?


I don’t play Golf. I even don’t understand the game in its entirety. If I had to explain it, I would say- and correct me if I am wrong- this is a game played by affluent people who have time, money, and prestige on large pristine green grass open-air courses where they discuss business, politics and make deals. The end result is to stroke a small white ball with a club into some small holes in the ground. Sometimes, I heard 18 or 21 holes.

That’s it. That’s all I know.

I also know that Tiger Wood is a golf famed winner. He went from fame to shame after his character and reputation have been widely gone under water after some personal issues in his life, which have also impacted negatively his professional ability to perform.

This emotional saga associated with physical pains led him wonder, just last year, if he would ever play again. He thought he was done. Now look what he’s done.

Last Sunday, he was able to emerge from the funk and win again. Sport analysts rank his last win as impressive as some of his greatest victories.

in an interview, Woods described what his rock bottom moment was, his dread, and what he did not want.

“Probably the low point was not knowing if I’d ever be able to live pain-free again,” Woods said. “Am I going to be able to sit, stand, walk, lay down without feeling the pain that I was in. I just didn’t want to live that way. This is how the rest of my life is going to be? It’s going to be a tough rest of my life. And so … I was beyond playing. I couldn’t sit. I couldn’t walk. I couldn’t lay down without feeling the pain in my back and my leg. That was a pretty low point for a very long time.”

Let me just repeat what kept my attention in this interview:  “It’s going to be a tough rest of my life.”

I go ahead to reflect, think, and ponder about this statement. I put it in perspective, and I pull out a tool, a book I read from the Life Leadership Essentials Series, entitled LADDER, Climbing out of a slump, and to never let a good slump go to waste.

slump

I ask myself what can I learn and share from Tiger Woods’ slump experience. This is a good one to learn from and to not let it go to waste. what can we learn from our slumps and not let them go to waste.

LADDER Climbing out of a Slump, forwarded by Dan Hawkins, a bestselling author, life-coach, and successful entrepreneur, is a book, a tool that will help you discover the art of a slump, and how to take action immediately and effectively.

In my next post, I will share with you the art of climbing a slump, and actions to be taken to live the life you’ve always wanted.

Be well,

#Rooseveltjeanfrancois (Rooseveltjanfranswa)

@rooseveltjf

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if you found this post useful, you might want to join other leaders in receiving life changing information from #Rooseveltjeanfrancois and the LIFE INFO (app) about leadership, literacy, and leverage- all the cutting edge intelligence you need to live the life you’ve always wanted and to keep ahead of the competition today.

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Confucius philosophical leadership learning: The Great Learning!


What the Great Learning teaches is: to illustrate illustrious virtue; to renovate the people; and to rest in the highest excellence.

The point where to rest being known, the object of pursuit is then determined; and, that being determined, an unperturbed calmness may be attained to.

tglTo that calmness there will succeed a tranquil repose. In that repose there may be careful deliberation, and that deliberation will be followed by the attainment of the desired end.

Things have their root and their branches. Affairs have their end and their beginning. To know what is first and what is last will lead near to what is taught in the Great Learning.

The ancients who wished to illustrate illustrious virtue throughout the world, first ordered well their own States.

Wishing to order well their States, they first regulated their families.

Wishing to regulate their families, they first cultivated their persons.

Wishing to cultivate their persons, they first rectified their hearts.

Wishing to rectify their hearts, they first sought to be sincere in their thoughts.

Wishing to be sincere in their thoughts, they first extended to the utmost of their knowledge.

Such extension of knowledge lay in the investigation of things.

Things being investigated, knowledge became complete.

Their knowledge being complete, their thoughts were sincere.

Their thoughts being sincere, their hearts were then rectified.

Their hearts being rectified, their persons were cultivated.

Their persons being cultivated, their families were regulated.

Their families being regulated, their States were rightly governed.

Their States being rightly governed, the entire world was at peace.

From the Son of Heaven down to the mass of the people, all must consider the cultivation of the person the root of everything besides.

It cannot be, when the root is neglected, that what should spring from it will be well ordered.

It never has been the case that what was of great importance has been slightly cared for, and, at the same time, that what was of slight importance has been greatly cared for.

Confucius, The Great Learning.

Remember your story, carry your story, and tell your story!


“I hope that you will always remember your story, and that you will carry your story with you as proudly as I carry mine.” First Lady Michele Obama told a graduating class of 100 students, giving the commencement address to Santa Fe Indian School.

Mrs Obama

She personalized the history of the African American experience, and shared her family’s roots in 19th century American chattel slavery. Her remarks seemed geared toward moving beyond a sense of connection between her and the audience, which was already palpable in the hall, to something deeper, something more akin to identification.

I am the great-great-granddaughter of Jim Robinson, who was born in South Carolina, lived as a slave and is likely buried in an unmarked grave on the plantation where he worked.

I am the great-granddaughter of Fraser Robinson, an illiterate houseboy who taught himself to read and became an entrepreneur—selling newspapers and shoes.

She spoke of values, claiming the shared values of respect, perseverance and integrity, three of the ten core values of the Santa Fe Indian School. She remarked on the hopeful, positive trajectory of the school and the accomplishments of its students.

Our story is about who we are. When we talk about our experiences, what we see, feel, do, fear, like with our own words, we create our own life.

Don’t try to be the next so and so. Be the first you. Remember your story, carry your story, and tell your story.

Your story makes you you.

Roosevelt