Ambient reading: new technology, new style of reading, new litterature.


Reading will never be the same. With new access to our new mobile devices, our reading  experience may be different with what it used to be.

With audio books, and eboooks, we consume more and more words, faster and faster.

We also have an opportunity to bring our own personalised experience to our own reading.

This is what writer Nathalie Moris called ‘ambient litterature’ the new way to read. Having the ambiance of our real life soaking, and interacting with our reading bring a fresh appeal to the narrative from the author.

Our mobile reading experience is touched, personalized, and individualized by where we are, the time, and the weather.

This whole combination makes reading a whole new experience.

 

 

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The long run and the short runs


“It’s easy to look at the long run and lull yourself into skipping a day now and then. But, the long run is made up of short runs,” this is what I read from a blog posted by bestselling author and blogger Set Godin.

The following are some questions Set Godin asked in his post that I invite you to reflect upon:

Is there something you do every day that builds an asset for you?

Every single day?

Something that creates another bit of intellectual property that belongs to you?

Something that makes an asset you own more valuable?

Something that you learn?

“Every single day is a lot of days”, Godin says.

 

Tell your stories to connect and dicover: no shame, no blame!


I attended City Speaksa storytelling event, last night in Pompano Beach, Florida, which reminds me, back in the days in my homeland  Haiti, when my dad used to gather us together, just to tell us stories.

Sometimes, they were folktales of Bouki and Malis, the villain and the smart; and other times it was just about his personal stories, telling us about his day to day dealing with  this thing called “life.”

Last night, it was about life stories from folks in the city, telling us their narratives about their life segments, and how they intersect with us, the listeners.

There were tellers, there were listeners. Moods swang from joy to sorrow. It was a real life experience.

I enjoyed it. It was a person to person moment. I discovered myself in the stories I heard, and connected with the speakers.

As Mij Byram, an expert storyteller, who introduced the event, said :

“Storytelling is about the connection. That connection is not magic. It’s real. It is about touching the hearts and imaginations of listeners. It is opening them to adventures, feelings and possibilities.”

“In  a story,”Mij added, “we can walk through fear and chase the villain. We can experience sorrow and joy and do it in the safe harbor of a story. A story can change thoughts and ideas.  A story can touch your heart, make you laugh or make you cry, it can comfort or challenge. A story can help you see yourself and your world in a new way.”

That’s excatly what happened to me when I left Pompano Beach last night reflecting, thinking, and pondering about what I heard about immigration, illegal immigration, thick accent, police interactions with black people, depression, and anxiety.

It was fascinated. A great delightful moment. I loved it.

Be well,

Roosevelt

 

NB.: City Speaks is a 50 minute event followed by a time of public interaction and reflection. To know more about their programming click here….

The Top Five Regrets of the Dying


Bronnie Ware, an author who worked in palliative care, wrote “The Top Five Regrets of the Dying.”

They are:

1.- I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

2.- I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.

3.- I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.

4.-  I wished I had stayed in touch with my friends

5.-  I wish I had let myself be happier.

These are significant issues. How can we positively address them when we still have some time?

Can we be kinder towards ouselves and others and be more determined to live the life we are truly here to live?

Be well,

Roosevelt

rojefra (2)

An Invitation:

if you found this post useful, you might want to join other leaders in receiving life changing information from #Rooseveltjeanfrancois and the LIFE INFO (app) about leadership, literacy, and leverage- all the cutting edge intelligence you need to live the life you’ve always wanted and to keep ahead of the competition today.
Please, download the Life Info (app) on your cell phone. Free sign up with referral lifeinfo or 61238105.
Thank you.

Tiger Woods is back to the top. How his ladder climbing out of a slump can help you climb your own ladder?


I don’t play Golf. I even don’t understand the game in its entirety. If I had to explain it, I would say- and correct me if I am wrong- this is a game played by affluent people who have time, money, and prestige on large pristine green grass open-air courses where they discuss business, politics and make deals. The end result is to stroke a small white ball with a club into some small holes in the ground. Sometimes, I heard 18 or 21 holes.

That’s it. That’s all I know.

I also know that Tiger Wood is a golf famed winner. He went from fame to shame after his character and reputation have been widely gone under water after some personal issues in his life, which have also impacted negatively his professional ability to perform.

This emotional saga associated with physical pains led him wonder, just last year, if he would ever play again. He thought he was done. Now look what he’s done.

Last Sunday, he was able to emerge from the funk and win again. Sport analysts rank his last win as impressive as some of his greatest victories.

in an interview, Woods described what his rock bottom moment was, his dread, and what he did not want.

“Probably the low point was not knowing if I’d ever be able to live pain-free again,” Woods said. “Am I going to be able to sit, stand, walk, lay down without feeling the pain that I was in. I just didn’t want to live that way. This is how the rest of my life is going to be? It’s going to be a tough rest of my life. And so … I was beyond playing. I couldn’t sit. I couldn’t walk. I couldn’t lay down without feeling the pain in my back and my leg. That was a pretty low point for a very long time.”

Let me just repeat what kept my attention in this interview:  “It’s going to be a tough rest of my life.”

I go ahead to reflect, think, and ponder about this statement. I put it in perspective, and I pull out a tool, a book I read from the Life Leadership Essentials Series, entitled LADDER, Climbing out of a slump, and to never let a good slump go to waste.

slump

I ask myself what can I learn and share from Tiger Woods’ slump experience. This is a good one to learn from and to not let it go to waste. what can we learn from our slumps and not let them go to waste.

LADDER Climbing out of a Slump, forwarded by Dan Hawkins, a bestselling author, life-coach, and successful entrepreneur, is a book, a tool that will help you discover the art of a slump, and how to take action immediately and effectively.

In my next post, I will share with you the art of climbing a slump, and actions to be taken to live the life you’ve always wanted.

Be well,

#Rooseveltjeanfrancois (Rooseveltjanfranswa)

@rooseveltjf

Roosevelt-pic

An Invitation:

if you found this post useful, you might want to join other leaders in receiving life changing information from #Rooseveltjeanfrancois and the LIFE INFO (app) about leadership, literacy, and leverage- all the cutting edge intelligence you need to live the life you’ve always wanted and to keep ahead of the competition today.

Please, download the Life Info (app) on your cell phone. Free sign up with referral lifeinfo or 61238105.

Thank you.

 

An intentional conversation with blogger, and singer Tara McLeod: A pleasure!


I walked in the Barnes & Nobles in Plantation, Florida, last Saturday morning, thinking in my mind, I am here for a couple of minutes, after missing an earlier appointment with a business acquaintance to discuss about leadership, life issues, and  community building to help people live the life they’ve always wanted. I would be there to take my time, and recompose myself after a glimpse of disappointment.

tara

I rushed in the magazines section in the back, picked up a couple of recent magazines, and walked through the aisles, looking for a comfortable sitting place. Two lazy boy chairs were available, I avoided them preferring a chair by a table where it would be more comfortable to take notes.

It was Christmas eve. The book store was full with last minutes shoppers looking for gifts for their loved ones.

I sat by the Sociology and Cultural Studies bookshelves where was pulling books, after books.

I said “Hi.”

She replied with a direct eye contact “Good morning.”

“Are you in Sociology?”

“No,” she answered shortly.

“What are you looking for,” I asked.

She said she was looking for the book “Women that run with the wolves.”

A customer representative helped her out to find this book. I asked her about the book and her type of reading.

She mentioned personal development, and self-help materials which lead to growth and becoming the best she can be.

She told me she’s very active in her church as a member of the choir, and the women ministry group.

She  blogs and speaks on relationships issues.

I told her what I do as a global connector for Life Leadership in South Florida and the Caribbean.

We agree to continue our conversation, link our communities to reach millions of people, and spread more light in a very dark world.

A pleasure to have met you Tara!

Roosevelt

 

 

Remember your story, carry your story, and tell your story!


“I hope that you will always remember your story, and that you will carry your story with you as proudly as I carry mine.” First Lady Michele Obama told a graduating class of 100 students, giving the commencement address to Santa Fe Indian School.

Mrs Obama

She personalized the history of the African American experience, and shared her family’s roots in 19th century American chattel slavery. Her remarks seemed geared toward moving beyond a sense of connection between her and the audience, which was already palpable in the hall, to something deeper, something more akin to identification.

I am the great-great-granddaughter of Jim Robinson, who was born in South Carolina, lived as a slave and is likely buried in an unmarked grave on the plantation where he worked.

I am the great-granddaughter of Fraser Robinson, an illiterate houseboy who taught himself to read and became an entrepreneur—selling newspapers and shoes.

She spoke of values, claiming the shared values of respect, perseverance and integrity, three of the ten core values of the Santa Fe Indian School. She remarked on the hopeful, positive trajectory of the school and the accomplishments of its students.

Our story is about who we are. When we talk about our experiences, what we see, feel, do, fear, like with our own words, we create our own life.

Don’t try to be the next so and so. Be the first you. Remember your story, carry your story, and tell your story.

Your story makes you you.

Roosevelt