Things to give up and habits to develop for a better new you in 2017!


Winston Churchill said “never, never give up!” But, to really live the life you’ve always wanted, you will have to give up some old, destructive behaviors and develop new habits.

It is said “bad habits are easy to form but hard to live with. Good habits are hard to form, but easy to live with.”

Blogger Zdravko Cvijetic, educator, posted on his platform 13 things you need to give up to become a top-performer in life by mastering your habits and productivity and use it to build a personal brand.

You can give up on some of them today, while it might take a bit longer to give up on others.

1. Give up on the unhealthy lifestyle

“Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.”  — Jim Rohn

Healthy Diet. Physical Activity. Rest. 

2. Give up the short-term mindset

“You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” Mae West

3. Give up on playing small

“Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people will not feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone, and as we let our light shine, we unconsciously give others permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others.” 

— Marianne Williamson

4. Give up your excuses

“It’s not about the cards you’re dealt, but how you play the hand.” ―Randy Pausch, The Last Lecture

5. Give up the fixed mindset

“The future belongs to those who learn more skills and combine them in creative ways.” ―Robert Greene, Mastery

6. Give up believing in the “magic bullet”

“Every day, in every way, I’m getting better and better.”  — Émile Coué

7. Give up perfectionism

Nothing will ever be perfect, no matter how much we try.

8. Give up multi-tasking

Being fully present and committed to one task, is indispensable.

9. Give up your need to control everything

“Some things are up to us, and some things are not up to us.”  — Epictetus, Stoic philosopher

10. Give up on saying YES to things that don’t support your goals

“He who would accomplish little must sacrifice little; he who would achieve much must sacrifice much; he who would attain highly must sacrifice greatly.”  — James Allen

11. Give up the toxic people

“You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” ―Jim Rohn

12. Give up your need to be liked

“The only way to avoid pissing people off is to do nothing important.”  — Oliver Emberton

13. Give up your dependency on social media and television

“The trouble is, you think you have time.”  — Jack Kornfield

Read the original content

 God bless,

Roosevelt

An intentional conversation with blogger, and singer Tara McLeod: A pleasure!


I walked in the Barnes & Nobles in Plantation, Florida, last Saturday morning, thinking in my mind, I am here for a couple of minutes, after missing an earlier appointment with a business acquaintance to discuss about leadership, life issues, and  community building to help people live the life they’ve always wanted. I would be there to take my time, and recompose myself after a glimpse of disappointment.

tara

I rushed in the magazines section in the back, picked up a couple of recent magazines, and walked through the aisles, looking for a comfortable sitting place. Two lazy boy chairs were available, I avoided them preferring a chair by a table where it would be more comfortable to take notes.

It was Christmas eve. The book store was full with last minutes shoppers looking for gifts for their loved ones.

I sat by the Sociology and Cultural Studies bookshelves where was pulling books, after books.

I said “Hi.”

She replied with a direct eye contact “Good morning.”

“Are you in Sociology?”

“No,” she answered shortly.

“What are you looking for,” I asked.

She said she was looking for the book “Women that run with the wolves.”

A customer representative helped her out to find this book. I asked her about the book and her type of reading.

She mentioned personal development, and self-help materials which lead to growth and becoming the best she can be.

She told me she’s very active in her church as a member of the choir, and the women ministry group.

She  blogs and speaks on relationships issues.

I told her what I do as a global connector for Life Leadership in South Florida and the Caribbean.

We agree to continue our conversation, link our communities to reach millions of people, and spread more light in a very dark world.

A pleasure to have met you Tara!

Roosevelt

 

 

The 20 habits of Eventual Millionaires


I just read this story about cultivating the right habits to become a millionaire. I am excited to share them with you.

habits1

Please, let me know which one you like best. And which one you are committed to develop day in and day out. You Read the original article here.

I’ll be glad to post to comment.

God bless,

Roosevelt

To face the cycle of anxiety, depression, and worryness: St Augustine sermons us to sing a joyful alleluia!


I just read this excerpt from a sermon by St. Augustine (Sermo 256, I.2.3.: PL 38, 1191-1193) in the Roman Office of Readings this Saturday  in my morning prayer.This is the 34th week of ordinary time, which is the last day of the liturgical year . The letter of Jude is the accomapnying biblical reading.

I am delighted to share with you this sermon of St Augustine, commonly recognized as the great teacher in the Western Church between the New Testament and St. Thomas Aquinas, as a response to our ongoing anxious state.

 

“Why do we now live in anxiety?,” asked Saint Augustine.

“Can you expect me not to feel anxious when I read: Is not man’s life on earth a time of trial? Can you expect me not to feel anxious when the words still ring in my ears: watch and pray that you will not be put to the test? Can you expect me not to feel anxious when there are so many temptations here below that prayer itself reminds us of them, when we say: Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us?”, he kept asking.

“Every day we make our petitions, every day we sin. Do you want me to feel secure when I am daily asking pardon for my sins, and requesting help in time of trial? Because of my past sins I pray: Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us, and then because of the perils still before me, I immediately go on to add: Lead us not into temptation. How can all be well with people who are crying out with me: Deliver us from evil? And yet, brothers, while we are still in the midst of this evil, let us sing alleluia to the good God who delivers us from evil.”

“Even here amidst trials and temptations let us, let all men, sing alleluia. God is faithful, says holy Scripture, and he will not allow you to be tried beyond your strength. So let us sing alleluia, even here on earth. Man is still a debtor, but God is faithful. Scripture does not say that he will not allow you to be tried, but that he will not allow you to be tried beyond your strength.”

“Whatever the trial, he will see you through it safely, and so enable you to endure. You have entered upon a time of trial but you will come to no harm—God’s help will bring you through it safely. You are like a piece of pottery, shaped by instruction, fired by tribulation. When you are put into the oven therefore, keep your thoughts on the time when you will be taken out again; for God is faithful, and he will guard both your going in and your coming out.”

“But in the next life, when this body of ours has become immortal and incorruptible, then all trials will be over. Your body is indeed dead, and why? Because of sin. Nevertheless, your spirit lives, because you have been justified. Are we to leave our dead bodies behind then? By no means. Listen to the words of holy Scripture: If the Spirit of him who raised Christ from the dead dwells within you, then he who raised Christ from the dead will also give life to your own mortal bodies. At present your body receives its life from the soul, but then it will receive it from the Spirit.”

“O the happiness of the heavenly alleluia, sung in security, in fear of no adversity! We shall have no enemies in heaven, we shall never lose a friend. God’s praises are sung both there and here, but here they are sung in anxiety, there, in security; here they are sung by those destined to die, there, by those destined to live for ever; here they are sung in hope, there, in hope’s fulfillment; here they are sung by wayfarers, there, by those living in their own country.”

“So, then, my brothers, let us sing now, not in order to enjoy a life of leisure, but in order to lighten our labors. You should sing as wayfarers do—sing, but continue your journey. Do not be lazy, but sing to make your journey more enjoyable. Sing, but keep going. What do I mean by keep going? Keep on making progress. This progress, however, must be in virtue; for there are some, the Apostle warns, whose only progress is in vice. If you make progress, youwill be continuing your journey, but be sure that your progress is in virtue, true faith and right living. Sing then, but keep going.”

 

My understanding of Christian Spirituality based on the reading of “Guiding principles for a Christian Spirituality” by Michael Downey.


I understand Spirituality as a human quest to discover where we, human beings, are from, where we are going, our connection with each other, and in a large extent, our relationship with a Higher Power greater than ourselves.

Therefore, Christian Spirituality is the global experience through time and space of this quest for meaning to those who accept to follow and believe Jesus-Christ as the One who models this Higher Power perfectly.

Reading the handout “Guiding principles for a Christian Spirituality” by theologian Michael Downey helps me to focus on the concept of “Christian Spirituality” as both a universal lived experience and an academic discipline.

This experience and knowledge are oriented towards the ultimate values and highest ideals perceived and pursued in the mystery of Jesus Christ.

In those 15 paragraphs, Downey specifies some key principles to promote the concrete experience of searching for God through specific guidelines.

I retain the 6 following elements as the main essential points of Downey’s thought in this context :

  1. The Christian life as an experience, and a story
  2. The Christian life as communion
  3. A life of prayer
  4. A life of growth, development, and maturation.
  5. A life of solidarity
  6. A life of stewardship

Each of this point has broadened my understanding of the concept of “Christian Spirituality” as I will develop in the following paragraphs.

  1. The Christian life as an experience, and a story

Christian Spirituality is an experience, and a story to be told. It involves us with God, Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit and others with inner and outer events. God uses human works, images, stories to accomplish His people. His revelation is ongoing. Experience is the source of all meaning. Each individual shapes his or her experiences in a unique way. Sharing stories lead us to spread, the message and style of Jesus are truly life-giving. Our telling stories keep traditions alive and meaningful. This is the base of the experience of the human relationship, and any relationship between human beings and God. (1)

  1. The Christian Life as communion

Christian Spirituality invites us to participate in God’s life through communion. communion is more than a memorial. This symbolic ceremony molds us with the Incarnate Word by the power of the Holy Spirit. Communion is not an individualistic matter; it is a body matter. It leads us to better relationship with God and with others. (2)

  1. A life of prayer

Prayer is the ongoing relation with God. it is one of the greatest gift our Lord has given us outside of salvation. Prayer is the pipeline of communication between God and His people, between God and those who love Him. Prayer engages God, enables God’s people, and enlarges His kingdom.

  1. A life of growth, development, and maturation.

Human growth and maturation are prerequisites for growing and maturing in the spiritual life. Our growth as human beings can often be a measure of our spiritual maturity. Spirituality itself can be defined as a “ fully human phenomenon, and it is a phenomenon of the fully human.” Human development is also applicable in regard to ones relationship with God. (3)

  1. A life of solidarity

Our light is to be shared with others. We are entailed to live in rightly ordered relationship with ourselves, other human beings, and God. The very heart and soul of the Christian Spiritual life is in solidarity with others above with the least disadvantaged, the disenfranchised. It is expressed through communion with the Incarnate Word of the Holy Spirit. The Christian spiritual life is reserved for an elite group usually vowed religious and clergy. All the baptized are called to the fullness of life in the Spirit.

  1. A life stewardship

Christian Spirituality is to be in service to others for the goods of creation. We also develop relationship between human and nonhuman life. We can use our God given gifts and talents to throw our lights on current issues such as global warming, war, human justice.

In Conclusion, this text on Christian Spirituality has helped me to better understand this concept on its aspect of a global experience with God. It has broadened my understanding on the connections between systematic theology and spirituality.  As Christians, we are followers of Christ, and with those guiding principles, we are better equipped to have dialogue and conversations with others based on our faith, and our personal development

Bibliography

“Guiding Principles for a Christian Spirituality” by Michael Downey. Understanding Christian Spirituality. Paulist Press, 1997; 146-150.

(1) Tad Dunne

(Published in The New Dictionary of Catholic Spirituality, ed. Michael Downey, Liturgical Press, 1993). http://users.wowway.com/~tdunne5273/Expernc.pdf

(2) Mark M. Mattison

The meaning of Communion

http://www.auburn.edu/~allenkc/openhse/communion.html

(3) Reflection on Psycho-Spiritual Development   – John Friel C.P.

http://daneoservices.weebly.com/refection-on-psycho-spiritual-development-john-friel-cp.html

 

A walking-talking conversation about business, life, and personal development!


I had a business walking and bonding meeting with a friend this morning. It was fun, entertaining, and offered us a deeper connection and foundation to build relationships and business.

I enjoyed walking and listening to Life Leadership Personal Development audios.

This morning, I had an opportunity to walk, and listen to a live talk from my friend who told me her success story, her dreams, her struggles, and victories.

She is a great speaker, and I am a good listener. This made our walking exercice an exceptional moment.

“Walking is the best thing for human bonding since the smile,” said blogger Melissa Balmain from the Leadership Platform, a feature of the Total Personal Development program offered by Life Leadership, a premier leadership and personal development company, I presented to my friend.

It was cool this Saturday morning. Kids were everywhere. Walkers came and went in a debonair atmosphere. And we walked, talked, sat, watched the birds perching on the ripples effect of the pond.

This walking meeting loosened our tongues. When I asked my friend “what’s a perfect day for her?”

She poured her hands gestures into the air to tell me “A day with no worries, with no pending transaction.”

The oxygen-induced brain boost we’re getting from exercise (which has been studied, and reported by Melissa Balmain) helps get our words rolling.

My friend wants to keep her mind with her up to her 90’s. That’s why she said when “I feel stressed and overwhelmed, I interrupt myself, to laugh, to sing, to dance, and get back to my problems with renewed energy.”

This walking and talking moment was a form of travel. It built a fantastic rapport up to a point my friend told me she is so grateful in her life above all for her daughter that she’s not afraid of death.

“My daughter is there for me to see myself, to finish what I have started,” she said adding “I’m like Moses.”

This was an ordinary walk, but an extraordinary talk. It required no money, but just our presence, and care for one other.

It was just two people enjoying many perks of a shared conversation in an ambiance of interesting sights and sounds.

That’s why I like what I do for a living as a connector, and LIFE member. I make friends, find needs, and transfer feelings.

I help my friends, with their permission, to live the life they’ve always wanted by connecting them with a community of like minded people who enjoy having fun, making money, and making a difference.

That fires me up!

God bless,

Roosevelt